Tag Archives: 1920s

Man with a Movie Camera [1929]

For my studies this year, I’ve watched in the order of 50 films, and the best of them is probably a 1929 silent pseudo-documentary called Man with a Movie Camera. It was made by a guy who got his start … Continue reading

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Live by Night [2016]

The 1920s are defined in the modern Western imagination by the Volstead Act, Prohibition, and the  criminal underworld it created. The reason is partially that the most successful and most powerful bootleggers of the age wanted it that way. Al … Continue reading

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12 Books of Christmas: The Great Gatsby

Having The Great Gatsby as a favourite novel is a cliche, a quick review of the top dozen hits for that search on google all included it. The main difference between it and, say, Ulysses or War and Peace as the Greatest Novel Ever Written ™, everyone … Continue reading

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Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them [2016]

The trick to getting value from reviews is to find a reviewer whose tastes match your own and then look for the thumbs-up/down signal in their review. Star ratings are awesome for this, except for that 3-star recommendation where the … Continue reading

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Whose Body? [1923]

As a break from my diet of Spy fiction while I get to grips with the genre for running Night’s Black Agents, I decided to try a Dorothy Sayers novel. She is one of the so-called Queens of Crime, along … Continue reading

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The Big Four [1927]

I’d hazard that most of the major writers of Spy Thrillers owe a lot of their story mechanics to the Detective genre. Jason Bourne pieces together the puzzle of his life by fitting together fragmentary memories and following information trails. … Continue reading

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The Mystery of the Blue Train [1928]

This was Agatha Christie’s 8th novel, and the 5th for Hercule Poirot. It came after the work widely regarded as Christie’s best, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and my favourite Poirot story, The ABC Murders. In a lot of ways, this … Continue reading

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